Being curator of meteorites allows Jesuit to ‘find God’ in all things

18 July 2019
Jesuit Brother Bob Macke and Jesuit Father Gabriele Gionti, an astronomer, prepare to give journalists a tour of the Vatican Observatory at the papal villa at Castel Gandolfo, Italy, Sept. 28, 2018. (Image: Paul Haring/CNS/FILE)

 

At the Vatican Observatory in Castel Gandolfo near Rome, Jesuit Brother Robert Macke finds his work as the curator of meteorites for the Vatican Observatory — formally founded in 1891 by Pope Leo XIII — allows him to, as the Jesuit saying goes, “find God in all things.”

“The universe is a big place, and all of it belongs to God’s creation, so all of it is a source of wonder and inspiration,” he said. “The motto of the Vatican Observatory is ‘Deum Creatorem Venite Adoremus’ (‘Come, Let Us Adore God the Creator’). In studying the universe and all that it contains, we can better appreciate the God who created it. For us, doing science is a form of worship.”

Signs of the Apollo missions are found throughout the Vatican Observatory, he said an interview with the Texas Catholic Herald, newspaper of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, from the observatory.

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With thanks to the Catholic News Service (CNS) and James Ramos, where this article originally appeared.

 

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